• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY as well as the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India: Old Civilizations in a New World."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    Khmer Rouge Leaders, Recently Sentenced to Life Imprisonment, Face New Genocide Charges

    by  • August 8, 2014 • Asia, International Justice • 
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    Nuon Chea

      The highest panel of judges on the joint United Nations-Cambodian government tribunal on crimes of the Khmer Rouge regime have cleared the way for a second trial of two top leaders of the Communist movement that devastated the country almost four decades ago. The new trial, completely separate from the earlier proceedings against...

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    Human Development That Sidetracks a Woman’s Power of Choice

    by  • August 4, 2014 • Development, Women's Issues • 
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    Cambodia

    The 2014 United Nations Human Development Report appeared at the end of July wrapped around the title “Sustaining Human Progress,” a goal that moves beyond meeting the targets that can measure achievement at any given time but cannot promise continuity or permanent improvement. The report’s subtitle, “Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience,” suggests how to...

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    US State Department Says the Senate Blocks American Diplomacy Globally

    by  • July 18, 2014 • Governance, Peace and Security, US Foreign Relations • 
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    US Secretary of State John Kerry with tktkt

    All eyes may be on Secretary of State John Kerry and his seemingly tireless, though exhausting, travels from continent to continent as multiple crises unfold around the world. Now the State Department has lashed out at the United States Senate for denying him and American diplomacy the backup they need by stalling confirmation of...

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    Helpless Bosnia and Its Women, 20 Years After Ethnic War

    by  • July 6, 2014 • Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, International Justice, Women's Issues • 
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    Enisa and Majda Prljaca

      SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina — “Please don’t let the world forget us again.” The plea is heard everywhere by men as well as by women in the picturesque Balkan city of Sarajevo, the site of Europe’s most destructive and sadistic conflict in more than half a century. Sarajevo was briefly in the news...

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    US Toughens Its Support for LGBT Tolerance Globally

    by  • June 22, 2014 • LGBT, US-UN Relations • 
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    John Kerry

    After years of lagging behind several European countries in official support for gay rights, the United States under President Barack Obama is advancing to the forefront internationally in both domestic and foreign policies. New policies in Washington, often instituted by executive orders that bypass conservative hurdles in the US Congress, reflect the rapid changes...

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    An Italian Priest and a US Health Group Win the 2014 UN Population Prize

    by  • June 18, 2014 • UN Agencies, Women's Issues • 
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    Aldo Marchesini, a doctor and a Roman Catholic priest, performing fistula surgery in Mozambique. UNFPA

    Putting a new focus on maternal health and obstetric fistula in particular, which devastates the lives of women and girls in many poor countries, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), has given its 2014 UN Population Award to an Italian doctor working in Mozambique and to an American maternal and child health organization with...

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    The Creation and Trafficking of New Illegal Drugs Widens, a UN Report Finds

    by  • June 5, 2014 • Health and Population, UN Agencies, UN Office on Drugs and Crime • 
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    Synthetic drugs have been tktkt. Here, bath salts, a type of "designer" drug.

    Confirming recent findings by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States and other agencies around the world, the United Nation Office on Drugs and Crime said in its annual report that new synthetic drugs, sometime compounded or combined with other substances, are becoming a dangerous, often lethal, menace globally. The...

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    Is a Better UN System Possible? Global Experts Respond to an Independent Survey

    by  • May 26, 2014 • Development • 
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    Members of the Ekal Nari Shakti Sangathan, a network that promotes the rights of widows. GAGANJIT SINGH/UN WOMEN

    An unusual survey of 3,400 people worldwide who know the United Nations has found strong support for some basic rethinking over the next decade on the organization’s work in development. Among the recommendations, over two-thirds of respondents suggested adding more nongovernmental representatives to governing bodies and better consolidating both organizational representation and programs in...

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