• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY as well as the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    No Room for LGBT Rights in the New UN Development Goals

    by  • May 17, 2015 • Development, LGBT, Sustainable Development Goals • 1 Comment
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    Amina Mohammed

    Before this year ends, the United Nations will have committed itself and its 193 member governments to a new 15-year development strategy to be hailed as a blueprint for ending poverty, expanding social justice and strengthening equality. Equality for whom is the question. Missing by deliberate design from the new plan, called the Sustainable...

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    In a World of Messy Conflicts, Nuclear Controls Face a Review

    by  • April 26, 2015 • Disarmament • 
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    IAEA Prep Meeting in Vienna 2012

    With vast regions of the Middle East in flames, many thousands of people dying in executions born of religious intolerance or left to drown at sea by morally repugnant criminal traffickers, it could seem like an odd time to turn attention to the long-range threat of nuclear weapons. On the contrary, say government disarmament...

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    Eastern Europe Presses Its Claim to the Secretary-General’s Office  

    by  • April 13, 2015 • Secretary-General, Security Council, Unesco, US-UN Relations, Women's Issues • 1 Comment
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    Vladimir Putin

    In 70 years of United Nations history, Eastern Europe has been the only regional group in the organization that has never filled the position of secretary-general. Western Europe has had three secretaries-general; Asia and Africa, two each; and Latin America and the Caribbean, one. The 23 nations of the Eastern European region, determined to...

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    Prostitution: A Word That UN Women Does Not Want to Hear

    by  • March 31, 2015 • Gender-Based Violence, Human Trafficking, Poverty, Women's Issues • 19 Comments
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    Pinki

    On the eve of a speech Ruchira Gupta was to give on International Women’s Day in New York as the recipient of a Woman of Distinction award, she got a strange email. Gupta, who has collected numerous awards for her work against sex slavery in India — including an Emmy for her 1996 documentary,...

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    Middle-Income Countries May Hold the Key to Ending Global Hunger

    by  • March 25, 2015 • Asia, Latin America, Poverty • 
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    China

    To the ever-expanding archive accumulating over recent years on how to make global development policies more effective, a venerable research organization has added a novel proposal. In a report published in March, the International Food Policy Research Institute suggests that looking at food-exporting rich countries as the key to ending hunger and malnutrition worldwide,...

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    Vanuatu Women Track Cyclone Pam’s Damage on Subsistence Lives

    by  • April 3, 2015 • Asia, Climate and Environment, Humanitarian Aid, Women's Issues • 
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    Children

    On March 13, a cyclone of historic proportions struck the South Pacific nation of Vanuatu with winds equivalent to those of a Category 5 hurricane. The story of this disaster briefly occupied the international media and then disappeared, perhaps because the death toll was surprisingly low. The United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian...

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    Sacking of Iraq’s Cultural Heritage Takes Yet Another Turn

    by  • March 4, 2015 • Asia, Middle East, Unesco • 
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    hatra

    The shocking scenes of irreplaceable centuries-old treasures being smashed and toppled from their pedestals in a museum in Mosul — with the rabid acts of destruction proudly videotaped by fighters who call themselves the Islamic State — has provoked global outrage. But for Iraqis, who have seen decades of losses over centuries of intermittent...

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    Caribbean Nations Preserve a Complicated Heritage

    by  • March 1, 2015 • Caribbean, UN Agencies, Unesco • 
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    Castillo San Felipe del Morro. Zug/Flickr

    DORADO, Puerto Rico — When Europeans first invaded the Caribbean beginning in the late-15th century — more by chance than by design — devastation soon followed. Local populations were decimated by diseases from another world, and native people’s doomed attempts to repel the fearsome strangers met with only more death. Within two centuries, the slave...

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    Angela Kane Is Leaving the UN in a Political Shuffle

    by  • March 2, 2015 • Disarmament, GOINGS-ON • 
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    Angela Kane, the UN High Representative for Disarmament Affairs, addressing the 2013 session of the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva.

    Angela Kane, one of the United Nations’ most respected and experienced officials and the lead negotiator in 2014 in persuading Syria to give up its chemical weapons, has announced unexpectedly that she will be leaving the organization. She has been the UN’s High Representative for Disarmament since March 2012. Reports are circulating around the...

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    Rising Attacks and Cultural Obstacles Denying Education for Girls

    by  • February 13, 2015 • Education, Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Sustainable Development Goals • 1 Comment
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    Schoolgirls in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, who have benefited from a British government program providing monthly stipends of about $1 to keep the girls in school. VICKI FRANCIS/DIFD

    In the few months remaining before a new set of development goals are set to be adopted in the United Nations to replace the Millennium Development Goals, specialists in many fields will be drilling down into why some of those MDGs have fallen short — sometimes far short — of their aspirations, especially in...

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