• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY as well as the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    A Broader Breastfeeding Campaign Emphasizes Mothers’ Health

    by  • September 2, 2015 • Health and Population, Poverty, Women's Issues • 
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    tktktk

    Every year, the first week of August is dedicated to promoting the exclusive feeding of newborn infants with natural breast milk, which evidence shows can ensure numerous health benefits for mother and child. There are few if any specialists in the field of infant health who would now dispute that. United Nations agencies, the...

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    Companies Possibly Using Conflict Minerals Fail to Disclose Such Information

    by  • August 19, 2015 • Africa, Gender-Based Violence, Peace and Security • 
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    Tin ore

    Fewer than a quarter of the 6,000 companies suspected of using minerals from the conflict region in and around the Democratic Republic of the Congo are disclosing information about their sources to United States authorities as required by American law, according to the first report on the issue from the investigative arm of the...

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    The Legal Push to End Genital Cutting of Girls in the US and Abroad Progresses

    by  • August 11, 2015 • Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Women's Issues • 2 Comments
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    More scenes of the reconciliation ceremony held by the Tasaru Rescue Center in Narok, Kenya.  PAUL MUNENE

    Almost 20 years have passed since the genital mutilation of girls has been outlawed in the United States, but the traditional practice has continued to grow ever faster in recent years with increased immigration from parts of Africa where it is most common. It is estimated that more than 500,000 girls and women in...

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    Freed From Extreme Poverty, but Left Out of the Middle Class

    by  • August 3, 2015 • Africa, Asia, Caribbean, Latin America, Poverty • 
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    Tajikistan is one of the few countries in the world that made the leap from tktkt. PETTERI KOKKONEN/UNDP

    When the final assessment of what the Millennium Development Goals achieved was released on July 6, the United Nations said confidently that more than 1 billion people had been lifted from poverty since 1990, the baseline year for setting the goals, which were then monitored from 2000 to 2015. But where did these poor...

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    US Policy Denies Emergency Abortion Globally for War Rape Victims

    by  • July 30, 2015 • Gender-Based Violence, Women's Issues • 
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    Boko Haram hostages

    In 1973, Jesse Helms, a newly elected United States senator and an ideologue contemptuous of the United Nations, dismissive of international treaties and completely devoid of compassion for the world’s poor, put his name on an amendment to the landmark 1961 United States Foreign Assistance Act banning any use of US funds to support...

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    The UN Tightens Rules on Peacekeeping Troops’ Medical Status

    by  • July 6, 2015 • UN Agencies, UN Peacekeeping • 
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    Peacekeepers from Ecuador, left, and Chile providing care at the Fraternite Notre Dam Medical Clinic, above the hills of Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti. LOGAN ABASSI/MINUSTAH

    Almost five years after a rampaging cholera epidemic coursed through the Artibonite River region of Haiti and moved rapidly around the country, the United Nations, which acknowledges that a deadly strain of the disease originated in or around a Nepali peacekeepers’ base, is tightening medical prevention rules for soldiers and police. National governments will...

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    From the US Supreme Court, a Shot Heard Round the World

    by  • June 26, 2015 • LGBT • 
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    As news of the United States Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage spread across America, reactions around the world were both celebratory and cautious — cautious because in 76 countries gay relationships are criminal relationships, and fear of arrest, violence and even death at the hands of adversaries haunts many lives. According to a...

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    UN Security Council and Troop Contributors Chided by Review Panel

    by  • June 18, 2015 • Peace and Security, Secretary-General, Security Council, UN Peacekeeping • 
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    A new report reviewing UN peacekeeping operations recommends smarter preventive steps to avoid superficial solutions. The peacekeeping mission in Ivory Coast, above, mourns Egyptian members killed in the line of duty, February 2015. ABDUL FATAI ADEGBOYE/UN PHOTO

    While restructuring at the top of the United Nations and better strategies and tactics for troops on the ground are issues provoking discussion and controversy after the recent release of a report by a high-level panel on current and future peacekeeping, less attention has been paid to the experts’ admonitions to the Security Council...

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