• About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY as well as the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India Changes Course," in the Foreign Policy Association's "Great Decisions 2015."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

    From the US Supreme Court, a Shot Heard Round the World

    by  • June 26, 2015 • LGBT • 
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    tktkt

    As news of the United States Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage spread across America, reactions around the world were both celebratory and cautious — cautious because in 76 countries gay relationships are criminal relationships, and fear of arrest, violence and even death at the hands of adversaries haunts many lives. According to a...

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    UN Security Council and Troop Contributors Chided by Review Panel

    by  • June 18, 2015 • Peace and Security, Secretary-General, Security Council, UN Peacekeeping • 
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    A new report reviewing UN peacekeeping operations recommends smarter preventive steps to avoid superficial solutions. The peacekeeping mission in Ivory Coast, above, mourns Egyptian members killed in the line of duty, February 2015. ABDUL FATAI ADEGBOYE/UN PHOTO

    While restructuring at the top of the United Nations and better strategies and tactics for troops on the ground are issues provoking discussion and controversy after the recent release of a report by a high-level panel on current and future peacekeeping, less attention has been paid to the experts’ admonitions to the Security Council...

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    UN Peacekeeping Needs Top-Down Restructuring, Expert Panel Says

    by  • June 16, 2015 • Peace and Security, UN Peacekeeping • 
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    A UN patrol in Western Sahara, where the UN has a peacekeeping mission. MARTINE PERRET/UN PHOTO

    The creation of a new office of deputy secretary-general for peace and security to consolidate and hasten United Nations’ responses to conflicts, and a surprising suggestion that the UN should not undertake missions involving counterterrorism were two major recommendations for the future of peacekeeping to emerge from a high-level seven-month study commissioned by Secretary-General...

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    Making the Case for a Greater US Presence in UN Peacekeeping

    by  • June 2, 2015 • Africa, Peace and Security, UN Peacekeeping, US-UN Relations • 
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    A female police officer for UN peacekeeping. LOGAN ABASSI

    United Nations peacekeeping needs new kinds of tools and troops to counter the demands posed by forces waging catastrophic wars beyond the control of governments and without even a semblance of adherence to the most rudimentary ethical rules of combat or international war crimes laws. The urgent need to rethink and retool peacekeeping, already...

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    Fake Drugs Pose a Threat to Gains in Global Health

    by  • May 27, 2015 • Health and Population • 
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    A vaccine campaign in Barbados, led by Pan American Health Organization.

    Counterfeit and substandard medicines and dietary supplements that are flooding pharmacies in both industrial and developing countries pose “a real and urgent threat to decades of success in global public health,” according to mounting evidence from scientists in a new report. In evidence gathered in over 17 countries, they found that up to 41...

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    No Room for LGBT Rights in the New UN Development Goals

    by  • May 17, 2015 • Development, LGBT, Sustainable Development Goals • 2 Comments
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    Amina Mohammed

    Before this year ends, the United Nations will have committed itself and its 193 member governments to a new 15-year development strategy to be hailed as a blueprint for ending poverty, expanding social justice and strengthening equality. Equality for whom is the question. Missing by deliberate design from the new plan, called the Sustainable...

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    In a World of Messy Conflicts, Nuclear Controls Face a Review

    by  • April 26, 2015 • Disarmament • 
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    IAEA Prep Meeting in Vienna 2012

    With vast regions of the Middle East in flames, many thousands of people dying in executions born of religious intolerance or left to drown at sea by morally repugnant criminal traffickers, it could seem like an odd time to turn attention to the long-range threat of nuclear weapons. On the contrary, say government disarmament...

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    Eastern Europe Presses Its Claim to the Secretary-General’s Office  

    by  • April 13, 2015 • Secretary-General, Security Council, Unesco, US-UN Relations, Women's Issues • 1 Comment
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    Vladimir Putin

    In 70 years of United Nations history, Eastern Europe has been the only regional group in the organization that has never filled the position of secretary-general. Western Europe has had three secretaries-general; Asia and Africa, two each; and Latin America and the Caribbean, one. The 23 nations of the Eastern European region, determined to...

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