• Barbara Crossette

    About Barbara Crossette

    Barbara Crossette is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY as well as the United Nations correspondent for The Nation. She is also a board member of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Previously, Crossette was the UN bureau chief for The New York Times from 1994 to 2001 and before that its chief correspondent in Southeast Asia and South Asia. She is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas," "The Great Hill Stations of Asia" and a Foreign Policy Association study, "India: Old Civilizations in a New World."

    Crossette won the George Polk award for her coverage in India of the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 and the 2010 Shorenstein Prize for her writing on Asia.

     

    An African Elected Head of the Inter-Parliamentary Union

    by  • March 21, 2014 • Africa, General Assembly, Governance • 

    Martin Chungong of IPU

    The Inter-Parliamentary Union has elected Martin Chungong of Cameroon as its secretary-general, the first African and the first non-European to lead the organization in its 125-year history. Chungong, a former member of the Cameroonian parliament, has been the Inter-Parliamentary Union’s deputy secretary-general under Anders Johnsson, of Sweden, who officially retires on June 30. Chungong has also been director of programs [...]

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    Poverty Stalks Eastern European and Central Asian Countries

    by  • March 11, 2014 • Asia, Poverty, World Bank • 

    A family in Macedonia is making coffee using a Primus stove after a power outage

    The world’s most abjectly poor people are most often — too often, they say — illustrated by faces from South Asia or sub-Saharan Africa, where numerically, the majority of the global poor live. A new interactive report from the World Bank moves the focus north, to eastern European countries and Central Asia, where scores of people [...]

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    Cambodian Tribunal Confronts New Hurdles

    by  • March 2, 2014 • Asia, International Justice • 

    Nuon Chea

    The tangled process of bringing even partial accounting and sentencing to a close in a United Nations-Cambodian joint tribunal judging the leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime that decimated the country’s population in the late 1970s and destroyed all civic and economic life, is on full display again in a purpose-built courtroom near Phnom Penh, [...]

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    Iraqi Women, Insisting on Their Innocence, Dealt Severe Rights Abuses

    by  • February 26, 2014 • Human Rights, Middle East, Women's Issues • 

    Woman on Iraq street

    There can be no other region in the world now as broad as the swath of Middle Eastern and North African nations where so many women are living in violence, extreme vulnerability and a corrosive foreboding about their future. These deprivations are occurring from Tunisia or Egypt — where women struggle to keep the legal [...]

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    UN Decolonizers Strive Again for Puerto Rican Independence

    by  • February 18, 2014 • Caribbean, General Assembly, Latin America, US-UN Relations • 

    Old San Juan, PR

    DORADO, Puerto Rico — Year after year, decade after decade, the United Nations General Assembly’s special committee on decolonization has taken up the issue of Puerto Rico’s status as a dependent commonwealth of the United States. Puerto Rico is self-governing but without the full representation in Washington enjoyed by the 50 American states or the [...]

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    Mexico Rising: Advances in Women’s Health and Rights

    by  • February 6, 2014 • Human Rights, Latin America, Women's Issues • 

    International Women's Day in Mexico City

      When the latest list of 20 top donors to UN Women appeared last year, there was only one country outside the richer nations of the world among them: Mexico. The Mexican commitment to the women’s agency reflects the strides that the country has made in promoting women’s rights in recent years, powered by government [...]

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    The Elders Support a Diplomatic Opening to Iran

    by  • January 31, 2014 • GOINGS-ON • 

    Kofi Annan and President Rouhani, Iran

    The Elders, a group of distinguished former global leaders led by Kofi Annan, the former United Nations secretary-general, made an unusual three-day visit to Iran at the end of January to meet with numerous officials, including President Hassan Rouhani of Iran. It was the first trip to Iran by The Elders, who said at the [...]

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    Parliamentary Group Warns of Political Perils as 2014 Elections Loom

    by  • January 23, 2014 • Africa, Asia, Governance, Middle East • 

    Bangkok demonstration November 2013

      A committee of the Inter-Parliamentary Union met in mid-January, as a busy year of elections globally was beginning, to confront the human-rights violations and sometimes lethal abuse suffered by 262 members of national legislatures in countries that often call themselves democracies. From Jan. 13 to 17, the Inter-Parliamentary Union’s committee on the human rights [...]

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    Nigeria Attracts Latest Criticism for Anti-Gay Laws

    by  • January 15, 2014 • Africa, Human Rights • 

    Goodluck Jonathan, president of Nigeria

    In an open letter to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Michel Sidibé, the executive director of UNAIDS, the organization called AIDS-Free World wants answers to questions about how the UN will deal with Nigeria after the adoption of a sweeping law broadening the criminalization of  homosexuality. Nigeria has the second-largest number of people globally [...]

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