• About Dulcie Leimbach

    Dulcie Leimbach is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY. She is the founder of PassBlue, for which she edits and writes, covering the United Nations, West Africa and women's issues. For PassBlue and other publications, she has reported from Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal as well as from Vienna and Budapest.

    Previously, she was an editor for the Coalition for the UN Convention Against Corruption; and from 2008 to 2011, she was the publications director of the United Nations Association of the USA, where she edited its flagship magazine, The InterDependent, and migrated it online in 2010. She was also the senior editor of UNA's annual book, "A Global Agenda: Issues Before the UN."

    Before UNA, Leimbach was an editor at The New York Times for more than 20 years, editing and writing for most sections of the paper, including the Magazine, Book Review and Op-Ed. She has been a fellow at Yaddo, the artists' colony in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and taught news reporting at Hofstra University. She lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.

    Snakes, Scorpions and Red Tape: Europeans Adjust to the UN Mission in Mali

    by  • February 11, 2016 • Africa, Terrorism, UN Peacekeeping, US Foreign Relations • 
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    A Minusma officer from Sweden patroling Timbuktu. The UN has a supercamp of about a dozen national troops located near the city's airport. MINUSMA/Harandane Dicko

    Since its rollout in 2013, the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Mali has been actively recruiting more European troops to strengthen its ranks of police, military and civilian personnel from African and Asian countries, typical sources for UN missions. The mission’s main mandate is to protect civilians, stabilize the country and carry out a...

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    Syrian Women Are Ready to Participate in UN-Led Geneva Peace Talks

    by  • January 20, 2016 • Gender-Based Violence, Human Rights, Middle East, Syria • 
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    A family in Syria sheltering in the basement of an abandoned school, in March 2013. R. GARCIA VILANOVA/ICRC

    While new Syrian peace talks organized by the United Nations remain tentatively scheduled to begin on Jan. 25 in Switzerland, a substantial group of Syrian women is preparing to convene in Geneva starting that day to demand an equal place at the negotiations table. Staffan de Mistura, the UN special envoy for Syria, who...

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    In Burkina Faso, a US Ambassador Wins Over a Slice of Francophone West Africa

    by  • January 13, 2016 • Africa, US Foreign Relations • 
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    Tulinabo Mushingi, center, the US ambassador to Burkina Faso

    OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso — Nowhere can the positive presence of the United States in West Africa be more obvious than in the quiet, dusty nation of Burkina Faso, a mostly rural state surrounded by six other countries of ranging stability: Benin, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Mali, Niger and Togo. Near the heart of a well-coordinated...

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    As Syrian Peace Talks Take Shape, How Will Women Take Part?

    by  • December 26, 2015 • Gender-Based Violence, Middle East, Peace and Security, Security Council, Syria, Women's Issues • 1 Comment
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    Syrian women refugees at the Keleti train station in Budapest, Sept. 4, 2015. MSTYSLAV CHERNOV/CREATIVE COMMONS

    When the United Nations Security Council recently approved timelines to begin peace talks and institute a national cease-fire in Syria, the language in the resolution gave no hint of the magnitude of such undertakings, nor did the congratulatory speeches afterward by diplomats delve into the details. That means the nitty-gritty work is left to...

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    A Monastery’s Farm in Burkina Faso Feels the Impacts of Climate Change

    by  • December 5, 2015 • Africa, Climate and Environment, Development, Health and Population • 
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    Koubri_village3

    KOUBRI, Burkina Faso — More than 2,500 miles away from this village, world leaders met recently in Paris to try to save the earth from severe climate change and its deadly effects. Here in West Africa, people in rural communities scrape together livelihoods in a region that is extra-vulnerable to drought and hunger, problems...

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    Women Compete in Burkina Faso’s Presidential Contest, a First for the Nation

    by  • November 29, 2015 • Africa, Governance • 
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    These Burkina Faso voters leave a polling station

    OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso — This small but determined West African country voted on Sunday in its first presidential election since its last president, Blaise Compaoré, was ousted in October 2014. He had ruled the country for 27 years and was finally pushed out by a grass-roots opposition movement. Although the front-runner, Roch Marc Kaboré,...

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    The Drug War: A Dangerous Trap for Poor Children and Their Families, a New Report Says

    by  • November 20, 2015 • Gender-Based Violence, Health and Population, Human Trafficking, Latin America, Poverty, UN Office on Drugs and Crime • 
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    The global drug war . Here, poppy field in Afghanistan, sources of opium. CREATIVE COMMONS

    In time for Universal Children’s Day, a new report shows how the war on drugs hurts children’s health, puts them into the line of fire amid drug-gang violence and leads them into the netherworld of human trafficking and enslavement. The drug war also destroys families when parents are unnecessarily imprisoned for drug crimes, among...

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    At Vienna Talks on Syria’s Future, the UN Finds Several Roles to Play

    by  • November 15, 2015 • Middle East, Peace and Security, Refugees, Security Council, Terrorism • 
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    At the Nov. 14 talks on Syria at the Grand Hotel in Vienna, from left: John Kerry, US secretary of state; Staffan de Mistura, UN special envoy for Syria; Sergey Lavrov, Russian foreign minister. US STATE DEPT.

    The United Nations has wedged its way into playing a monitoring role in a possible cease-fire in Syria and a convening role in gathering the Syrian government and opposition parties to try to meet for formal talks by Jan. 1. The goal is to begin negotiating an end to the prolonged war there, which has...

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