• About Dulcie Leimbach

    Dulcie Leimbach is a fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center of CUNY and an editor for the Coalition for the UN Convention against Corruption. From 2008 to 2011, she was the publications director at the United Nations Association of the USA, where she edited its flagship magazine, The InterDependent, and migrated it online in 2010. She was also the senior editor of UNA's annual book, "A Global Agenda: Issues Before the UN." Before UNA, Leimbach was an editor at The New York Times for more than 20 years, where she edited and wrote for most sections of the paper, including the Magazine, Book Review, Op-Ed and Arts & Leisure. She has been a fellow at Yaddo, the artists' colony in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and taught news reporting at Hofstra University. She lives with her family in Brooklyn, N.Y.

    With Mali in Political Turmoil, High FGM Rates Persist

    by  • November 20, 2014 • Africa, Gender-Based Violence, Health and Population, Human Rights, Middle East, Women's Issues • 1 Comment
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    As part of a tktktk

    BAMAKO, Mali — In the primarily Francophone and Anglophone region of West Africa, Mali is said to have one of the highest rates of female genital mutilation, with about 91 percent of girls and women having undergone the circumcision — a rate that has not only stayed stubbornly high but may also be inching...

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    The UN Exerts More Pressure on North Korea and Its Rights Record

    by  • November 18, 2014 • Asia, General Assembly, Human Rights • 
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    Michael Donald Kirby (Australia), Chairperson of the Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea, speaks to journalists following a Security Council meeting. On the right is Marzuki Darusman (Indonesia) and left is Sonja Biserko (Serbia).
17 April 2014

    The United Nations General Assembly’s human-rights committee denied Cuba’s attempt to stop efforts to send the North Korean leadership to trial in the International Criminal Court for alleged crimes against humanity. The abuses include starvation, forced labor, executions, torture, rape and infanticide — committed mostly in the country’s political prison camps. Instead, the committee voted...

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    Burkina Faso’s People, Opposing an Autocrat, Feel Let Down by the UN

    by  • November 5, 2014 • Africa, Governance, Secretary-General, Security Council, US Foreign Relations • 
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    Compaoré

    The fast-moving people-power coup that ousted a longtime leader of the landlocked West African country of Burkina Faso took not only powerful nations and international institutions by surprise — including the United Nations, France, the United States, the African Union and African regional groups — but also the Burkina protesters themselves. The demonstrations started...

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    Turkey Loses as Five New Elected Members to Join the Security Council

    by  • October 16, 2014 • General Assembly, Security Council • 
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    Jim Mclay

    Five new members have been elected to join the United Nations Security Council: Angola, Venezuela, Malaysia, New Zealand and Spain. The first three countries ran unopposed for the five two-year term seats open on the council, representing their regions, respectively: Africa, Latin America and Caribbean and Asia. New Zealand and Spain ran for the...

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    As Abortion Rights Expand in Some Regions, Others Absorb Setbacks

    by  • September 21, 2014 • Health and Population, Human Rights, Women's Issues • 
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    Pro-abortion rally in Spain.

      Even as more countries have expanded the rights of women to safe, legal abortions in the last 20 years, some countries — particularly certain areas in the United States and in Central America — have rolled back such rights with equal intensity by imposing tighter restrictions. The issue of abortion, embedded in the...

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    Obama Speaks to the UN: Together, We Must Strike Out Terrorism

    by  • September 24, 2014 • General Assembly, US-UN Relations • 
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    Barack Obama, president of the United States, speaking at the opening of the 69th session of the General Assembly.

    Amid hypertight security at United Nations headquarters in New York, President Barack Obama told the packed mass of 100-plus global leaders meeting at the opening day of the 69th General Assembly session that the United States, in a current world of “pervasive unease,” cannot take on the fight against violent extremism and other serious...

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    For Journalists Covering Climate Change, the Topic Goes Beyond Science

    by  • September 14, 2014 • Climate and Environment, Health and Population • 
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    ournalists who cover the environment can often end up reporting on such tangential subjects as population and women’s rights. A scene from the post-2004 tsunami disaster off Indonesia, above. JULIEN HARNEIS/UNICEF

    NEW ORLEANS — In this urban symbol of disaster unpreparedness, journalists who cover climate change and the environment gathered this month, almost exactly nine years after Hurricane Katrina tore this city apart, to swap stories and advice while brainstorming communally on their beat. In a world that is ever more intertwined, it was clear...

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    US to Convene a Summit at UN on Stopping Extremists

    by  • September 3, 2014 • General Assembly, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Middle East, Security Council, Uncategorized, US-UN Relations • 2 Comments
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    Samantha Power, the American ambassador to the United Nations, speaking to the media on Sept. 3, 2014.

    President Barack Obama will hold a summit late this month in the United Nations Security Council to try to counter the surging power and strength of the Islamic terrorists that have seized parts of the Middle East this summer and other violent extremists worldwide. The summit, to convene on Sept. 25, will occur during...

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    Saving Timbuktu’s Manuscripts, One Ancient Page at a Time

    by  • August 25, 2014 • Africa, Security Council, UN Peacekeeping • 
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    Technicians working for Savama, digitizing the manuscripts.

    BAMAKO, Mali — The deliberate burning of thousands of ancient manuscripts by the Islamic jihadists who seized Timbuktu and other parts of northern Mali in 2012 dealt an emotional blow to the culture and scholars there and far beyond. To add insult to injury, some of the manuscripts, which were destroyed in the Ahmed...

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