• Irwin Arieff

    About Irwin Arieff

    Irwin Arieff is a veteran writer and editor with extensive experience writing about international diplomacy and food, cooking and restaurants. Before leaving daily journalism in 2007, he was a Reuters correspondent for 23 years, serving in senior posts in Washington, Paris and New York as well as at the United Nations. He also wrote restaurant reviews for The Washington Post and Washington City Paper in the 1980s and 1990s with his wife, Deborah Baldwin.

    Resource Wars: How Afraid Should We Be of China?

    by  • March 26, 2014 • BOOKS • 

    Xi Jinping of China

    The United States and Japanese military held joint war games in California in February, practicing how to invade and take back an island seized by hostile forces. While they didn’t say whose forces they were worried about, the drill was one more sign of growing global fears that China’s People’s Liberation Army may soon grab [...]

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    Just About Everyone Wanted Benazir Bhutto Dead

    by  • January 12, 2014 • BOOKS • 

    Benazir Bhutto, the Pakistani prime minister who was killed by a teenage suicide bomber in 2008.

    Why write a whodunit when you can’t say who done it? This is the challenging task undertaken by Heraldo Muñoz, a veteran Chilean diplomat and United Nations official, in his new book, “Getting Away With Murder: Benazir Bhutto’s Assassination and the Politics of Pakistan.” In 2009, the UN asked Muñoz to head an investigation into [...]

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    Paname, a Warm Slice of Paris Worth the Walk

    by  • February 28, 2014 • UN EATS • 

    Flourless chocolate cake at Paname restaurant

    At Paname, a new restaurant that bears the French slang name for Paris, it’s not just about what’s cooking but making it good looking too. A bit of a hike from the UN, just north of 56th Street on Second Avenue, Paname offers a $20 prix-fixe lunch. If you can spare the time for a [...]

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    Defending Women’s Rights Against Muslim Fundamentalism

    by  • November 17, 2013 • BOOKS • 1 Comment

    Afghan women sorting pistachios in Herat

    Karima Bennoune grew up in Algeria in the 1990s, a dark period when the country was riven by Muslim fundamentalist violence and a repressive military dictatorship that responded to the fundamentalist threat with its own campaign of terror. Her father, Mahfoud Bennoune, an intellectual and outspoken critic of both the authorities and the fundamentalists who [...]

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    Pennylane: Where the Blue-Badged Go to Caffeinate

    by  • December 3, 2013 • UN EATS • 

    Pennylane Coffee

    Has the United Nations never had a hangout? It does now. Drop by Pennylane Coffee just about any time of day and you’ll see that nearly everyone is sporting the blue UN badge. The storefront bears no name or street number, so take a walk down 45th Street between First and Second Avenues and look [...]

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    ‘Creative’ Indian: You Want That on Rice or Salad?

    by  • October 9, 2013 • UN EATS • 

    Grilling tandoori chicken

    One of the great things about New York’s restaurant scene is its diversity. You don’t have to look very far to find seductive fare from Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa — not to mention New Orleans, Cape Cod and Texas. So why is it that when you’re looking for lunch in [...]

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    At Masq, Burlesque Mixed With a Notable Kitchen

    by  • September 15, 2013 • UN EATS • 

    Masq Restaurant and Lounge

    At long last, there’s a burlesque hall right down the street from the United Nations. I just go there for the food, of course. “From live music and always plenty of room to dance, to Dinner Theatre featuring Coney Island Side Shows, Burlesque and Soulful Singing, our entertainment is always eclectic and fun!” boasts the venue’s [...]

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    Shocking! Uncle Sam Is Not an Honest Broker

    by  • July 3, 2013 • BOOKS • 

    Demonstration against land confiscation, Beit Ummar

      You shouldn’t need a book to tell you that the Palestinians have gotten pretty much zilch out of the Middle East peace process. So readers of “Brokers of Deceit: How the U.S. Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East” are unlikely to be astonished by what they find there. The core argument of the [...]

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