• Ramesh Thakur

    About Ramesh Thakur

    Ramesh Thakur is the director of the Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Disarmament at Australia National University in Canberra and a professor of international relations in the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy. He was vice rector and senior vice rector of United Nations University (and assistant secretary-general of the UN) from 1998–2007. Educated in India and Canada, he was also a professor of international relations at the University of Otago in New Zealand and professor and head of the Peace Research Center at the Australian National University, while also advising the Australian and New Zealand governments on arms control, disarmament and international security issues. In addition, Thakur was a principal author of the Responsibility to Protect doctrine and a senior adviser on reforms and principal writer of the UN secretary-general’s second reform report (2002). He has written or edited more than 40 books, 400 articles and book chapters. His most recent book is "The Responsibility to Protect: Norms, Laws and the Use of Force in International Politics" (London: Routledge, 2011).

    The Differing No-Nuke Stance Between Australia and New Zealand

    by  • November 29, 2013 • WORLDVIEWS • 1 Comment

    Licorne nuclear test, 1971, French Polynesia

    CANBERRA, Australia — Because of the unique destructive capacity and uncontrollable effects of nuclear weapons, the almost indescribable horror associated with their use informed the very first resolution of the United Nations General Assembly in 1946. It has been a recurring theme ever since in blue-ribbon international commissions, Non-Proliferation Treaty review conferences and General Assembly [...]

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    The G20 vs. the UN Development System: Two Rivals Heat Up

    by  • June 11, 2013 • Development • 

    G20 meeting at the Kremlin

    The Group of 20 nations is more capable of replicating development success models than the United Nations manages to do within its own development ranks, representing a major challenge to the UN system and its second-most important agenda item after the maintenance of peace and security. The G20 also represents other challenges to the UN [...]

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    A Walk Between War and Peace for the UN Nuclear Agency

    by  • July 6, 2012 • WORLDVIEWS • 1 Comment

    Yukiya Amano, the chief of the UN International Atomic Energy Agency. He is said to be closely allied with the United States and others in the West.

    As international negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program and the boundaries between peaceful uses and weaponization intensify, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog, and its chief, Yukiya Amano, also grow more important. The agency has no choice but to balance all considerations carefully in the delicate tightrope. [...]

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    The US-UN Dance Recovers Its Balance

    by  • June 4, 2012 • US-UN Relations, WORLDVIEWS • 5 Comments

    Susan Rice

    CANBERRA — The United Nations is located at the cross-section of Interdependence Avenue and Multilateral Cooperation Street in Manhattan. But its destiny lies at the intersection of Indifference Avenue and Hostility Street in Washington. That was the case, at least, under the George W. Bush administration through the mode of John Bolton, the United States [...]

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